Summer Term 2024 Schedule

!!Please note location and access details at the bottom of this post!!

Introducing Progress and Poverty

Repeats three times this term

Henry George

Thursday, May 30, 5:30 – 7:30PM 

Thursday June 6, 5:30 – 7:30 PM*

Thursday June 13, 5:30 – 7:30 PM

In his 1879 masterpiece Progress & Poverty, Henry George proposed to end poverty by recognizing a clear and logical distinction between private property and community property. America took a different path, but Chuck Metalitz (May 30 and June 13 sessions) says George’s proposal is the best way to bring prosperity to the struggling people of America today.

After a brief outline of George’s early life and work, he’ll consider the remedies proposed in our time for poverty, and evaluate their potential to assure that everyone has the opportunity to get a comfortable living. Then he’ll present George’s remedy, which is even more valid in 2024 than it was in the gilded age, and note some of the obstacles to its implementation.

Of course there will be time for questions and discussion.

This single session is intended to provide an overview of what Progress & Poverty covers, and why it’s worthwhile for thinking people to investigate it today. At the conclusion of the session, you’ll be invited to sign up for the complete Progress & Poverty course, but there’s no obligation to do so.

*The June 6 session is presented by George Menninger, who brings practical experience in application of Georgist theory.

 

Progress and Poverty

Thursdays, June 13 thru August 15, 5:30 – 7:30 PM [no class July 4]

This course is based on Henry George’s book of the same name, supplemented by modern readings, presentations, and some videos. The first class is Introducing Progress & Poverty, then there are eight additional sessions thru August 15.  From this course:

  • You will learn a method of reasoning that is useful in understanding all sorts of community problems.
  • You will know the mechanism by which pover­ty tends to worsen as the economy progresses, and why programs aimed at alleviating poverty can have, at best, only limited success.
  • You will see the inherent contradictions which cause “economic development” programs to fail.
  • You will understand the fundamental cause of the ongoing financial crises.
  • You will know why similar crises occur repeatedly, every decade or two.
  • You will recognize why honest and efficient govern­ment, improved public education, and many other desirable reforms cannot by themselves bring pros­perity nor end poverty.
  • You will have a better understanding of the economic system under which we live.
  • You will know how Liberty and Justice are essential elements of any system which works for everybody.
  • You will understand and have evaluated for yourself a method of public finance which might end poverty and prevent financial collapses.

Instructor: Adam H. Kerman

Advanced Courses can be arranged upon request.

All of the above events are at Signature Offices, 333 S Wabash Ave #2700, Chicago IL 60604. To register, email us events@hgchicago.org or phone 312 362-9302.

BUILDING SECURITY WILL REQUIRE YOU TO SHOW ID UPON ENTERING. We have no choice in this regard, but if it’s a concern to you, let us know and we will try to arrange a workaround.

Winter Term Schedule

!!Please note location and access details at the bottom of this post!!

Introducing Progress and Poverty

Tuesday, January 16, 5:30 – 7:30PM

In his 1879 masterpiece Progress & Poverty, Henry George proposed to end poverty by recognizing a clear and logical distinction between private property and community property. America took a different path, but Chuck Metalitz says George’s proposal is the best way to bring prosperity to the struggling people of America today.

After a brief outline of George’s early life and work, he’ll consider the remedies proposed in our time for poverty, and evaluate their potential to assure that everyone has the opportunity to get a comfortable living. Then he’ll present George’s remedy, which is even more valid in 2024 than it was in the gilded age, and note some of the obstacles to its implementation.

Of course there will be time for questions and discussion.

This single session is intended to provide an overview of what Progress & Poverty covers, and why it’s worthwhile for thinking people to investigate it today. At the conclusion of the session, you’ll be invited to sign up for the complete Progress & Poverty course, but there’s no obligation to do so.

Progress and Poverty

Tuesdays, January 16 thru March 26, 5:30 – 7:30PM

This course is based on Henry George’s book of the same name, supplemented by modern readings, presentations, and some videos. The first class is Introducing Progress & Poverty, then there are nine additional sessions thru March 26.  From this course:

  • You will learn a method of reasoning that is useful in understanding all sorts of community problems.
  • You will know the mechanism by which pover­ty tends to worsen as the economy progresses, and why programs aimed at alleviating poverty can have, at best, only limited success.
  • You will see the inherent contradictions which cause “economic development” programs to fail.
  • You will understand the fundamental cause of the ongoing financial crises.
  • You will know why similar crises occur repeatedly, every decade or two.
  • You will recognize why honest and efficient govern­ment, improved public education, and many other desirable reforms cannot by themselves bring pros­perity nor end poverty.
  • You will have a better understanding of the economic system under which we live.
  • You will know how Liberty and Justice are essential elements of any system which works for everybody.
  • You will understand and have evaluated for yourself a method of public finance which might end poverty and prevent financial collapses.

Instructor: Adam H Kerman

Economic Science

Thursdays, January 18 thru March 14, 5:30-7:30 PM

The Science of Political Economy, which George intended to correct the shortcomings of college-level courses in the field, is the main text for this course. Prior completion of Progress & Poverty is required. You can choose to read George’s original text, or an excellent abridgement by Lindy Davies. There will also be some supplementary material.

 Topics addressed include:

  • how civilization extends and increases the limited powers of the individual
  • the nature of wealth
  • theories of value
  • diminishing returns
  • the relation of space and time in production
  • the nature of trade
  • causes of confusion as to property
  • voluntary and involuntary cooperation
  • money and credit
  • functions of land, labor, and capital.

All of the above events are at Signature Offices, 333 S. Wabash #2700, Chicago 60604. To register, email us or phone 312 362 9302.

BUILDING SECURITY WILL REQUIRE YOU TO SHOW ID UPON ENTERING. We have no choice in this regard, but if it’s a concern to you, let us know and we will try to arrange a workaround.

Land and Labor Acknowledgments

“Fountain of Time” by Lorado Taft. Photo by artistmac (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 Deed )

Land Acknowledgment

We recognize that this land was occupied by other folks before us. Some of them may have practiced more just systems of land tenure. Because no human created land, all land titles are necessarily the result of conquest, force, and fraud.

We assert that land belongs in usufruct to the living. And that rent is justly shared among the community.

Determining exactly who is the “community” and how the rent should be shared among them are legitimate topics for discussion, that we’ll probably never all completely agree on.

Labor Acknowledgment

Unlike the Federal capitol, none of our buildings was constructed by slave labor, and our city is not named after an enslaver. Labor improved the land we occupy by raising its level to improve drainage, and by building, maintaining and continuing to operate the infrastructure which makes it more useful.

Robert F Jene (1933-2023)

Bob Jene (relaxing after a class in 2008)

Longtime Instructor, Board member and former Administrative Director of the Henry George School of Chicago, Bob Jene died October 22.  He had been involved with the School since the 1980s, teaching Progress & Poverty as well as advanced courses, giving seminars on topics such as the Costly Returns of the income tax, and No Farms No Food about the need to preserve agricultural land. He earned his living as a computer programmer.  Obituary.

There will be a remembrance in Rogers Park on November 18, and mass and burial at Eau Claire on November 25.  Details 

(The family requests RSVP using the link on the pdf, or here.)

We will miss Bob’s dedication and enthusiasm for the Georgist understanding.

New mailing and shipping address

The box lobby of Loop Station of the Chicago Post Office hasn’t offered 24-hour access for a number of years. Mail for the box section hasn’t been put up on Saturdays for a number of years either. Due to higher fees and less convenient access, we surrendered our PO Box on October 30, 2023.

Use this address to send mail to us. We can also receive packages at this address.

Henry George School of Social Science Chicago Illinois
333 S Wabash Ave Suite 2700
Chicago IL 60604

This is the location in the Loop at which we hold presentations and classes.

Class Schedule for Fall 2023

Henry George School will be offering Introducing Progress and Poverty and two class during Fall 2023.

Course Day/Time Starts Ends Sessions Instructor location
Event Introducing Progress and Poverty (serves as first session of Progress and Poverty) 5:30 PM Thursday October 12 1 Chuck Metalitz Loop
Basic Progress and Poverty (classic version) 5:30 PM Thursday October 19 December 21 2-10 Adam Kerman Loop
Advanced Applied Economics ADVANCED COURSE 5:30 PM Monday October 9 December 11 10 Chuck Metalitz Loop or by Zoom

Loop events and classes meet at Signature Office Center, 333 S Wabash Ave #2700.

You are welcome to attend the first session of either course without paying any fee.  If you choose to enroll in the course, a $25 fee is requested to help cover expenses. The registration fee includes the text and all class materials.

Class is scheduled for two hours, 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM Central time, but some adjustment can be made to accommodate student constraints.

Applied Economics is an ADVANCED COURSE, which presupposes familiarity with the concepts explored in Progress and Poverty.  Students should have previously taken Progress and Poverty or its equivalent with us or at another Henry George School, or through the Henry George Institute, or elsewhere.

Applied Economics will also be offered by Zoom. You must register by email to attend by Zoom. events@hgchicago.org

Due to building policies, you must register to attend any of our events and classes at 333 S Wabash Ave #2700.  Let us know by email events@hgchicago.org or call 312 362-9302 to attend.  There’s no obligation.

Help us celebrate Henry George Day September 4 in Evanston

Ganesha in the Garden
Like LVT, a Remover of Obstacles — Image credit Cristina Kaisserian CC BY-NC 2.0

Friends of the Henry George School will gather again in Evanston to celebrate the birthday of Henry George. (He was actually born September 2, 1839, but we customarily observe on the Monday holiday designated to honor working people.) Due to local solar conditions, we’ll start around 3 PM, continuing until more-or-less dark around 7 PM.

All graduates, students, prospective students, volunteers, and other supporters and friends of the Henry George School are invited. It’d be great if you want to bring food or drink to share, but that’s not required. But please do let us know you’ll be coming. While we’ll have grillables and other edibles, water and beer; it’ll be helpful if someone volunteers to bring a bag of ice, some soft drinks, etc. Also email if you have any questions.

To: events@hgchicago.org

Business phone: 312 362-9302

Please let us know, preferably by email,  that you’ll attend. When you do, we’ll respond with the exact address.

Capitalism, Socialism, Georgism at Platypus Affiliated Society, University of Chicago chapter

The Platypus Affiliated Society, University of Chicago chapter, has invited Chuck Metalitz to give a teach-in. It’s aimed at the university community, but all are welcome.

Capitalism, Socialism, Georgism
by Chuck Metalitz

5 pm till 7 pm
Tuesday, February 21, 2023

Platypus Affiliated Society University of Chicago chapter
Cobb Lecture Hall
Room 102
5811 S Ellis Ave
Chicago, Illinois

https://www.facebook.com/events/884469779530105/

Getting into the habit of thinking — Introducing Progress and Poverty

Think
image credit: theclevelandkid24 CC BY 2.0

One of our graduates observed that our Progress and Poverty course “helped me get into the habit of thinking, and not just accepting things.”  If you’d like to gain that habit, or even if not, you might enjoy discovering some important ideas with Introducing Progress and Poverty. For folks who have the day off on Monday, October 10, we have a presentation at 2:00 in the afternoon.  For everybody, we’ll also do this at 6:15PM the same day, as  well as subsequently on November 9 (5:30 PM), December 8 (6:00 PM), and next year on January 12 (6:00 PM). Our conference room is at Signature Offices, in Chicago at 333 S Wabash Ave #2700.   The presentation is free and without obligation, but building management requires that you preregister by sending us an email To: events@hgchicago.org or phoning 312/362-9302. Be sure to provide your first and last name, email address, phone number, and which session you’d like to attend.

Introducing Progress and Poverty outlines the way the economy works, including the main causes of persistent poverty, and proposes a remedy that seems to have worked wherever it has been even partially tried. The free program is an overview of our ten-session Progress and Poverty introductory course which starts January 19 and serves as the first session of the course.

This initial session is free. If you choose to enroll in Progress and Poverty, you’ll be asked for a $25 registration fee and given course materials.

Introducing Progress and Poverty

We’ll present Introducing Progress and Poverty 1 PM Sunday August 21 2022 ( Rogers Park Public Library, 6907 N Clark St, Chicago Illinois) and 6:15 PM Thursday September 15 (333 S Wabash Ave #2700 northeast corner of Van Buren St, Chicago Illinois) as the first session of the 10-week Progress and Poverty course. Please note that the September 15 presentation has been rescheduled from an earlier date.

Introducing Progress and Poverty outlines the way the economy works, including the main causes of persistent poverty, and proposes a remedy that seems to have worked wherever it has been even partially tried. It’s also an overview of our ten-session Progress and Poverty introductory course which has much more detailed information.

This initial session is free. If you choose to enroll in Progress and Poverty, you’ll be asked for a $25 registration fee and given course materials.

If you plan to attend our Thursday September 15 session (6:15 PM at 333 S Wabash Ave #2700 northeast corner of Van Buren St, Chicago, Illinois), please note that building management REQUIRES THAT YOU SIGN UP IN ADVANCE SO THEIR SECURITY GUARD WILL HAVE YOUR NAME ON THE ADMISSION LIST. You can do that sending an email message

To: events@hgchicago.org

or calling 312 362-9302. Please provide your full name, email address, and cell phone number.